Dear Lord Nash

The article in the TES about your speech to the Challenge Partnership national conference last week certainly made me think. (It seems I’m not alone, judging by the comments the article provoked.)  You covered much ground, but here are my initial concerns about what you said.

Why do you think that education always has something to learn from business? Is it really a one-way street? Does business have nothing to learn from education? I’ve worked in the public sector for 25 years. That doesn’t make me blind to bureaucracy, but it does help me to see the benefits of a shared sense of endeavour focused on something bigger than profit. And it doesn’t make me blind to all the news stories about businesses  whose eagerness to appease their shareholders gets in the way of customer service, or staff wellbeing. In short, I don’t think we’re yet at the point where social workers, doctors, and teachers, similarly beleaguered though they are, feel they have much to learn about work ethics and accountability from bankers.

The TES reports that you also said that good school leaders  “always put children’s interests before those of adults.” Well yes. Their whole job is think about children’s immediate, medium-term and long-term interests. But these same school leaders are being asked to act in their school’s interest, not the interest of their pupils, through the association of test scores with league tables, through Ofsted and academy-takeovers. It would be quite helpful if you could point that out to the Secretary of State.

I was glad to hear your concern at the amount of time teachers spend planning lessons (and your suggestion that teaching practice follow the evidence). As a parent witnessing the daily struggle that my children’s teachers, and my teacher friends, have in finding enough hours in the day to be a teacher (never mind anything else), I am all too aware that they are struggling to keep pushing the ball up the hill let alone to make it roll smoothly. But your solution is that teachers “embrace standardisation”? Where relevant, they already do: teachers share lesson plans, they share online resources, they discuss goals.  The idea that they aren’t already looking for ways to save time is quite laughable. The reason they prepare for lessons is to make sure they are completely familiar with what it is that they will be doing, why they are doing it, and what they are hoping to achieve by doing it. In much the same way that anyone would read up on a subject before giving a speech about it.  One lesson education might learn from business is that raising staff satisfaction pays dividends. Devaluing teaching by turning teachers into delivery systems for off-the-peg resources is the exact opposite.

One more thing. You are quoted as saying: “I think in the past too often teachers have confused their individuality with their professionalism”. It would be helpful (never mind polite) if you could supply some evidence for this assertion.

In summary, it’s difficult not to conclude that you are mainly interested in the business opportunities that necessarily arise from a market-led model in schools, promoting a proliferation of  educational ‘products’ – be they teaching robots, or test papers.

 

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